Welcome to Mixed Practice: Speed Booster

This is a time-bound test. The timer will start after you hit the "Next" button.

Directions (1-5): In the questions given below, calculate and find the exact values up to two decimals

Q1. 27.27% of 1353 + 17.5% of 563
Q2. 55% of 8966 – 72.72% of 3645
Q3. 37.5% of 848 + 33.33% of 3870
Q4. 16.67% of 2166 – 40% of 560
Q5. 36.36% of 9287 – 52% of 632
Directions (6-10): Read the following sentences carefully and mark the part of the sentence which has error in it as your answer. Check grammar, spellings, redundancy etc (Errors of punctuation must be ignored)

Q6.
Q7.
Q8.
Q9.
Q10.
Directions (11-15): Solve the following and mark the answers that follow. You are not expected to calculate the exact value

Q11. √33124 × √2601 – (83)² = (?)² + (37)² 
Q12. 22440 ÷ √(?) = 34 x 12
Q13. √915849 + √795664 = (?)2
Q14. √1024 + √7921 × 48.5 = ?
Q15. √(5² × 14 - 6 × 7 + (4)² = ?

Directions (16-25): In each question below are given three statements followed by two conclusions. Taking the statements to be true select the conclusions that logically follow:
Q16.


Statement-
(I) Some readers are logical
(II) No logical are confused
(III) Some confused are baseless

Conclusions-
(I) All baseless being logical is a possibility
(II) All logical being baseless is a possibility

Q17.

Statement-
(I) No even is odd
(II) Some odds are prime
(III) All squares are even

Conclusion-
(I) All square being prime is a possibility
(II) Some odds are even
Q18.

Statements-
(I) Some percentage are questions
(II) No questions are difficult
(II) Difficults which are percentage are simplifications

Conclusions-
(I) Some simplifications being questions is a possibility
(II) Some difficult being questions is a possibility
Q19.

Statements-
(I) Some refill are recharge
(II) No recharge is a rectangle
(III) All rectangles are rounds

Conclusion-
(I) Some rounds are refills
(II) No refill is a round
Q20.

Statement-
(I) No basket is a ball
(II) No ball is butter
(III) Some butter is blade

Conclusion-
(I) All ball being blade is a possibility
(II) Some blades are definitely not ball
Q21.

Statement-
(I) All towers are tractors
(II) All tractors are templates
(III) All trees are templates

Conclusions-
(I) Some trees are towers
(II) No tower is a tree
Q22.

Statement-
(I) No petrol is a diesel
(II) All diesels are gas
(III) All petrol are ethanol

Conclusion-
(I) All ethanol being diesel is a possibility
(II) All petrol being gas is a possibility
Q23.

Statements-
(I) Some privates are jets
(II) All jets are rockets
(III) All rockets are planes

Conclusions-
(I) Some private are planes
(II) Some private being rockets is a possibility
Q24.

Statement-
(I) No river is a sea
(II) All ponds are rivers
(III) Some sea are salty

Conclusion-
(I) Some Salty are ponds
(II) No rivers are salty
Q25.

Statement-
(I) Some trees are plants
(II) Some plants are seeds
(III) Some seeds are water

Conclusions-
(I) No trees are waters
(II) Some water are trees

Directions: Study the following table carefully and answer the given questions.


Number of students appeared and qualified in an examination from five states over the years 2011 to 2016Table
Q26. What is the difference in the average number of qualified students from state N, taken all years together and average number of qualified students from state P taken all years together except 2011?

Directions: Study the following table carefully and answer the given questions.


Number of students appeared and qualified in an examination from five states over the years 2011 to 2016Table
Q27.
 What is the difference between 40% of total disqualified students in year 2014 and 40% of total disqualified students in 2012?

Directions: Study the following table carefully and answer the given questions.


Number of students appeared and qualified in an examination from five states over the years 2011 to 2016Table

Q28. By approximately what percent of the difference in number of disqualified students from M and P in 2016 more or less than the difference between disqualified students from states N and Q in year 2012 ?

Directions: Study the following table carefully and answer the given questions.


Number of students appeared and qualified in an examination from five states over the years 2011 to 2016Table
Q29. The ratio of General, OBC and SC candidates in those who disqualified in year 2012 was 6 : 4 : 3. If total number of SC girls who disqualified in the exam from all states together in that year was 355, then find the total number of SC boys who disqualified in the exam in that year ?

Directions: Study the following table carefully and answer the given questions.


Number of students appeared and qualified in an examination from five states over the years 2011 to 2016Table

Q30. Total number of disqualified students from state O all over the years is approximately what percent of the total disqualified students in year 2011?

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/ phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions


With telecom and internet penetration growing steadily, digital payments are winning acceptance in India. A Google- BCG report released last year estimated the Indian digital payments industry would grow to $500 billion by 2020 and would account for 15 per cent of India’s GDP. It also said more than 50 per cent of the internet users in the country would embrace digital payments by 2020. The Government’s recent demonetisation drive has transformed the entire digital payments scenario almost overnight. The biggest beneficiaries of the move, of course, have been mobile wallet companies. User numbers for mobile wallets have soared. For digital wallet companies, this has been driven primarily by the low number of point-of-sales (PoS) machines (required to swipe credit or debit cards) across the country. While the country has over 14 million retail outlets, PoS machines number barely 1.5 million. Low penetration of PoS terminals across India is a problem. Digital India being one of the 10 major thrust areas in Budget 2017-18, plans are underway to ramp up these numbers.


Indian banks will be introducing one million PoS terminals bythis month. Another two million Aadhaar-linked PoS terminals maybe commissioned by September. That said, for a nation of a billion -plus people, a few million PoS terminals are merely drops in the ocean.


Next, the masses are still unable to use smartphones efficiently to make mobile payments easily. For this to happen, smartphone sales and penetration across India need to rise dramatically. But that’s easier said than done due to multiple barriers, particularly since India is an extremely price-sensitive market.


The third challenge that assails both urban and rural, rich and poor users concerns security. The fear of a security breach leading to their money being siphoned off is especially true for new users of e-payment. While various such options exist, each of which has intrinsic security features, users lack reassurance that these are fully secure. Occasional reports of security breaches only heighten such apprehensions. In this case, the best way forward is for digital payment entities to significantly enhance security features, whereby hacking such systems becomes well-nigh impossible. This may be possible via multiple layers of protection such as stringent encryption, use of biometrics and multiple software levels that drive near- total secure transactions. While focusing on security, a digital payment system should also be simple, safe and convenient to use, and remain platform-agnostic. In essence, the system should work seamlessly irrespective of whether customers are using credit or debit cards or making payments through already-active payment platforms such as digital wallets or the Government’s UPI (Unified Payment Interface). Apart from the above, lack of acceptability of digital wallets among vendors is another hurdle as many are still behind the technology adoption curve. It’s imperative to minimise entry barriers for customers by keeping charges minimal. It is also important to educate all stakeholders about working in unison to fulfill the Government’s mission of promoting a less-cash society.

Q31. According to the passage, which of the following challenge/s is/are being faced by the government to strengthen Digital India?

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/ phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions


With telecom and internet penetration growing steadily, digital payments are winning acceptance in India. A Google- BCG report released last year estimated the Indian digital payments industry would grow to $500 billion by 2020 and would account for 15 per cent of India’s GDP. It also said more than 50 per cent of the internet users in the country would embrace digital payments by 2020. The Government’s recent demonetisation drive has transformed the entire digital payments scenario almost overnight. The biggest beneficiaries of the move, of course, have been mobile wallet companies. User numbers for mobile wallets have soared. For digital wallet companies, this has been driven primarily by the low number of point-of-sales (PoS) machines (required to swipe credit or debit cards) across the country. While the country has over 14 million retail outlets, PoS machines number barely 1.5 million. Low penetration of PoS terminals across India is a problem. Digital India being one of the 10 major thrust areas in Budget 2017-18, plans are underway to ramp up these numbers.


Indian banks will be introducing one million PoS terminals bythis month. Another two million Aadhaar-linked PoS terminals maybe commissioned by September. That said, for a nation of a billion -plus people, a few million PoS terminals are merely drops in the ocean.


Next, the masses are still unable to use smartphones efficiently to make mobile payments easily. For this to happen, smartphone sales and penetration across India need to rise dramatically. But that’s easier said than done due to multiple barriers, particularly since India is an extremely price-sensitive market.


The third challenge that assails both urban and rural, rich and poor users concerns security. The fear of a security breach leading to their money being siphoned off is especially true for new users of e-payment. While various such options exist, each of which has intrinsic security features, users lack reassurance that these are fully secure. Occasional reports of security breaches only heighten such apprehensions. In this case, the best way forward is for digital payment entities to significantly enhance security features, whereby hacking such systems becomes well-nigh impossible. This may be possible via multiple layers of protection such as stringent encryption, use of biometrics and multiple software levels that drive near- total secure transactions. While focusing on security, a digital payment system should also be simple, safe and convenient to use, and remain platform-agnostic. In essence, the system should work seamlessly irrespective of whether customers are using credit or debit cards or making payments through already-active payment platforms such as digital wallets or the Government’s UPI (Unified Payment Interface). Apart from the above, lack of acceptability of digital wallets among vendors is another hurdle as many are still behind the technology adoption curve. It’s imperative to minimise entry barriers for customers by keeping charges minimal. It is also important to educate all stakeholders about working in unison to fulfill the Government’s mission of promoting a less-cash society.

Q32. According to the author, what does the government do to provide adquate protection of network resources?

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/ phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions


With telecom and internet penetration growing steadily, digital payments are winning acceptance in India. A Google- BCG report released last year estimated the Indian digital payments industry would grow to $500 billion by 2020 and would account for 15 per cent of India’s GDP. It also said more than 50 per cent of the internet users in the country would embrace digital payments by 2020. The Government’s recent demonetisation drive has transformed the entire digital payments scenario almost overnight. The biggest beneficiaries of the move, of course, have been mobile wallet companies. User numbers for mobile wallets have soared. For digital wallet companies, this has been driven primarily by the low number of point-of-sales (PoS) machines (required to swipe credit or debit cards) across the country. While the country has over 14 million retail outlets, PoS machines number barely 1.5 million. Low penetration of PoS terminals across India is a problem. Digital India being one of the 10 major thrust areas in Budget 2017-18, plans are underway to ramp up these numbers.


Indian banks will be introducing one million PoS terminals bythis month. Another two million Aadhaar-linked PoS terminals maybe commissioned by September. That said, for a nation of a billion -plus people, a few million PoS terminals are merely drops in the ocean.


Next, the masses are still unable to use smartphones efficiently to make mobile payments easily. For this to happen, smartphone sales and penetration across India need to rise dramatically. But that’s easier said than done due to multiple barriers, particularly since India is an extremely price-sensitive market.


The third challenge that assails both urban and rural, rich and poor users concerns security. The fear of a security breach leading to their money being siphoned off is especially true for new users of e-payment. While various such options exist, each of which has intrinsic security features, users lack reassurance that these are fully secure. Occasional reports of security breaches only heighten such apprehensions. In this case, the best way forward is for digital payment entities to significantly enhance security features, whereby hacking such systems becomes well-nigh impossible. This may be possible via multiple layers of protection such as stringent encryption, use of biometrics and multiple software levels that drive near- total secure transactions. While focusing on security, a digital payment system should also be simple, safe and convenient to use, and remain platform-agnostic. In essence, the system should work seamlessly irrespective of whether customers are using credit or debit cards or making payments through already-active payment platforms such as digital wallets or the Government’s UPI (Unified Payment Interface). Apart from the above, lack of acceptability of digital wallets among vendors is another hurdle as many are still behind the technology adoption curve. It’s imperative to minimise entry barriers for customers by keeping charges minimal. It is also important to educate all stakeholders about working in unison to fulfill the Government’s mission of promoting a less-cash society.

Q33. Which of the following is NOT TRUE in the context of the passage?

A) Smartphone penetration is copious for people to take advantage of its advanced services.
B) Random reports of security breach condense concerns regarding usage of digital medium.
C) There are over 14 million retail in India but barely 1.5 million PoS machines.

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/ phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions


With telecom and internet penetration growing steadily, digital payments are winning acceptance in India. A Google- BCG report released last year estimated the Indian digital payments industry would grow to $500 billion by 2020 and would account for 15 per cent of India’s GDP. It also said more than 50 per cent of the internet users in the country would embrace digital payments by 2020. The Government’s recent demonetisation drive has transformed the entire digital payments scenario almost overnight. The biggest beneficiaries of the move, of course, have been mobile wallet companies. User numbers for mobile wallets have soared. For digital wallet companies, this has been driven primarily by the low number of point-of-sales (PoS) machines (required to swipe credit or debit cards) across the country. While the country has over 14 million retail outlets, PoS machines number barely 1.5 million. Low penetration of PoS terminals across India is a problem. Digital India being one of the 10 major thrust areas in Budget 2017-18, plans are underway to ramp up these numbers.


Indian banks will be introducing one million PoS terminals bythis month. Another two million Aadhaar-linked PoS terminals maybe commissioned by September. That said, for a nation of a billion -plus people, a few million PoS terminals are merely drops in the ocean.


Next, the masses are still unable to use smartphones efficiently to make mobile payments easily. For this to happen, smartphone sales and penetration across India need to rise dramatically. But that’s easier said than done due to multiple barriers, particularly since India is an extremely price-sensitive market.


The third challenge that assails both urban and rural, rich and poor users concerns security. The fear of a security breach leading to their money being siphoned off is especially true for new users of e-payment. While various such options exist, each of which has intrinsic security features, users lack reassurance that these are fully secure. Occasional reports of security breaches only heighten such apprehensions. In this case, the best way forward is for digital payment entities to significantly enhance security features, whereby hacking such systems becomes well-nigh impossible. This may be possible via multiple layers of protection such as stringent encryption, use of biometrics and multiple software levels that drive near- total secure transactions. While focusing on security, a digital payment system should also be simple, safe and convenient to use, and remain platform-agnostic. In essence, the system should work seamlessly irrespective of whether customers are using credit or debit cards or making payments through already-active payment platforms such as digital wallets or the Government’s UPI (Unified Payment Interface). Apart from the above, lack of acceptability of digital wallets among vendors is another hurdle as many are still behind the technology adoption curve. It’s imperative to minimise entry barriers for customers by keeping charges minimal. It is also important to educate all stakeholders about working in unison to fulfill the Government’s mission of promoting a less-cash society.

Q34. Which of the following is TRUE in the context of the passage?

A) Digital India is seeing a growth in acceptance with increasing telecom and internet penetration.
B) According to the author, digital transformation is a trivial pillar for effort to stagndte India.
C) Lack of adaptability by many vendors is a challenge in having more access to digital systems.

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/ phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions



With telecom and internet penetration growing steadily, digital payments are winning acceptance in India. A Google- BCG report released last year estimated the Indian digital payments industry would grow to $500 billion by 2020 and would account for 15 per cent of India’s GDP. It also said more than 50 per cent of the internet users in the country would embrace digital payments by 2020. The Government’s recent demonetisation drive has transformed the entire digital payments scenario almost overnight. The biggest beneficiaries of the move, of course, have been mobile wallet companies. User numbers for mobile wallets have soared. For digital wallet companies, this has been driven primarily by the low number of point-of-sales (PoS) machines (required to swipe credit or debit cards) across the country. While the country has over 14 million retail outlets, PoS machines number barely 1.5 million. Low penetration of PoS terminals across India is a problem. Digital India being one of the 10 major thrust areas in Budget 2017-18, plans are underway to ramp up these numbers.




Indian banks will be introducing one million PoS terminals bythis month. Another two million Aadhaar-linked PoS terminals maybe commissioned by September. That said, for a nation of a billion -plus people, a few million PoS terminals are merely drops in the ocean.




Next, the masses are still unable to use smartphones efficiently to make mobile payments easily. For this to happen, smartphone sales and penetration across India need to rise dramatically. But that’s easier said than done due to multiple barriers, particularly since India is an extremely price-sensitive market.




The third challenge that assails both urban and rural, rich and poor users concerns security. The fear of a security breach leading to their money being siphoned off is especially true for new users of e-payment. While various such options exist, each of which has intrinsic security features, users lack reassurance that these are fully secure. Occasional reports of security breaches only heighten such apprehensions. In this case, the best way forward is for digital payment entities to significantly enhance security features, whereby hacking such systems becomes well-nigh impossible. This may be possible via multiple layers of protection such as stringent encryption, use of biometrics and multiple software levels that drive near- total secure transactions. While focusing on security, a digital payment system should also be simple, safe and convenient to use, and remain platform-agnostic. In essence, the system should work seamlessly irrespective of whether customers are using credit or debit cards or making payments through already-active payment platforms such as digital wallets or the Government’s UPI (Unified Payment Interface). Apart from the above, lack of acceptability of digital wallets among vendors is another hurdle as many are still behind the technology adoption curve. It’s imperative to minimise entry barriers for customers by keeping charges minimal. It is also important to educate all stakeholders about working in unison to fulfill the Government’s mission of promoting a less-cash society.

Q35. According to the passage, which of the following is the foremost concern of using digital medium across all the sections of society?

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below it. Certain words/ phrases have been printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions


With telecom and internet penetration growing steadily, digital payments are winning acceptance in India. A Google- BCG report released last year estimated the Indian digital payments industry would grow to $500 billion by 2020 and would account for 15 per cent of India’s GDP. It also said more than 50 per cent of the internet users in the country would embrace digital payments by 2020. The Government’s recent demonetisation drive has transformed the entire digital payments scenario almost overnight. The biggest beneficiaries of the move, of course, have been mobile wallet companies. User numbers for mobile wallets have soared. For digital wallet companies, this has been driven primarily by the low number of point-of-sales (PoS) machines (required to swipe credit or debit cards) across the country. While the country has over 14 million retail outlets, PoS machines number barely 1.5 million. Low penetration of PoS terminals across India is a problem. Digital India being one of the 10 major thrust areas in Budget 2017-18, plans are underway to ramp up these numbers.


Indian banks will be introducing one million PoS terminals bythis month. Another two million Aadhaar-linked PoS terminals maybe commissioned by September. That said, for a nation of a billion -plus people, a few million PoS terminals are merely drops in the ocean.


Next, the masses are still unable to use smartphones efficiently to make mobile payments easily. For this to happen, smartphone sales and penetration across India need to rise dramatically. But that’s easier said than done due to multiple barriers, particularly since India is an extremely price-sensitive market.


The third challenge that assails both urban and rural, rich and poor users concerns security. The fear of a security breach leading to their money being siphoned off is especially true for new users of e-payment. While various such options exist, each of which has intrinsic security features, users lack reassurance that these are fully secure. Occasional reports of security breaches only heighten such apprehensions. In this case, the best way forward is for digital payment entities to significantly enhance security features, whereby hacking such systems becomes well-nigh impossible. This may be possible via multiple layers of protection such as stringent encryption, use of biometrics and multiple software levels that drive near- total secure transactions. While focusing on security, a digital payment system should also be simple, safe and convenient to use, and remain platform-agnostic. In essence, the system should work seamlessly irrespective of whether customers are using credit or debit cards or making payments through already-active payment platforms such as digital wallets or the Government’s UPI (Unified Payment Interface). Apart from the above, lack of acceptability of digital wallets among vendors is another hurdle as many are still behind the technology adoption curve. It’s imperative to minimise entry barriers for customers by keeping charges minimal. It is also important to educate all stakeholders about working in unison to fulfill the Government’s mission of promoting a less-cash society.

Q36. According to the author, what should the Government do to make India a cash-less economy?

Directions: Choose the word/group of words which is MOST SIMILAR in meaning to the word/group of words printed in bold (highlighted in colour) as used in the passage.

With telecom and internet penetration growing steadily, digital payments are winning acceptance in India. A Google- BCG report released last year estimated the Indian digital payments industry would grow to $500 billion by 2020 and would account for 15 per cent of India’s GDP. It also said more than 50 per cent of the internet users in the country would embrace digital payments by 2020. The Government’s recent demonetisation drive has transformed the entire digital payments scenario almost overnight. The biggest beneficiaries of the move, of course, have been mobile wallet companies. User numbers for mobile wallets have soared. For digital wallet companies, this has been driven primarily by the low number of point-of-sales (PoS) machines (required to swipe credit or debit cards) across the country. While the country has over 14 million retail outlets, PoS machines number barely 1.5 million. Low penetration of PoS terminals across India is a problem. Digital India being one of the 10 major thrust areas in Budget 2017-18, plans are underway to ramp up these numbers.


Indian banks will be introducing one million PoS terminals bythis month. Another two million Aadhaar-linked PoS terminals maybe commissioned by September. That said, for a nation of a billion -plus people, a few million PoS terminals are merely drops in the ocean.


Next, the masses are still unable to use smartphones efficiently to make mobile payments easily. For this to happen, smartphone sales and penetration across India need to rise dramatically. But that’s easier said than done due to multiple barriers, particularly since India is an extremely price-sensitive market.


The third challenge that assails both urban and rural, rich and poor users concerns security. The fear of a security breach leading to their money being siphoned off is especially true for new users of e-payment. While various such options exist, each of which has intrinsic security features, users lack reassurance that these are fully secure. Occasional reports of security breaches only heighten such apprehensions. In this case, the best way forward is for digital payment entities to significantly enhance security features, whereby hacking such systems becomes well-nigh impossible. This may be possible via multiple layers of protection such as stringent encryption, use of biometrics and multiple software levels that drive near- total secure transactions. While focusing on security, a digital payment system should also be simple, safe and convenient to use, and remain platform-agnostic. In essence, the system should work seamlessly irrespective of whether customers are using credit or debit cards or making payments through already-active payment platforms such as digital wallets or the Government’s UPI (Unified Payment Interface). Apart from the above, lack of acceptability of digital wallets among vendors is another hurdle as many are still behind the technology adoption curve. It’s imperative to minimise entry barriers for customers by keeping charges minimal. It is also important to educate all stakeholders about working in unison to fulfill the Government’s mission of promoting a less-cash society.


Q37. INTRINSIC
Directions: Choose the word/group of words which is MOST SIMILAR in meaning to the word/group of words printed in bold (highlighted in colour) as used in the passage.

With telecom and internet penetration growing steadily, digital payments are winning acceptance in India. A Google- BCG report released last year estimated the Indian digital payments industry would grow to $500 billion by 2020 and would account for 15 per cent of India’s GDP. It also said more than 50 per cent of the internet users in the country would embrace digital payments by 2020. The Government’s recent demonetisation drive has transformed the entire digital payments scenario almost overnight. The biggest beneficiaries of the move, of course, have been mobile wallet companies. User numbers for mobile wallets have soared. For digital wallet companies, this has been driven primarily by the low number of point-of-sales (PoS) machines (required to swipe credit or debit cards) across the country. While the country has over 14 million retail outlets, PoS machines number barely 1.5 million. Low penetration of PoS terminals across India is a problem. Digital India being one of the 10 major thrust areas in Budget 2017-18, plans are underway to ramp up these numbers.


Indian banks will be introducing one million PoS terminals bythis month. Another two million Aadhaar-linked PoS terminals maybe commissioned by September. That said, for a nation of a billion -plus people, a few million PoS terminals are merely drops in the ocean.


Next, the masses are still unable to use smartphones efficiently to make mobile payments easily. For this to happen, smartphone sales and penetration across India need to rise dramatically. But that’s easier said than done due to multiple barriers, particularly since India is an extremely price-sensitive market.


The third challenge that assails both urban and rural, rich and poor users concerns security. The fear of a security breach leading to their money being siphoned off is especially true for new users of e-payment. While various such options exist, each of which has intrinsic security features, users lack reassurance that these are fully secure. Occasional reports of security breaches only heighten such apprehensions. In this case, the best way forward is for digital payment entities to significantly enhance security features, whereby hacking such systems becomes well-nigh impossible. This may be possible via multiple layers of protection such as stringent encryption, use of biometrics and multiple software levels that drive near- total secure transactions. While focusing on security, a digital payment system should also be simple, safe and convenient to use, and remain platform-agnostic. In essence, the system should work seamlessly irrespective of whether customers are using credit or debit cards or making payments through already-active payment platforms such as digital wallets or the Government’s UPI (Unified Payment Interface). Apart from the above, lack of acceptability of digital wallets among vendors is another hurdle as many are still behind the technology adoption curve. It’s imperative to minimise entry barriers for customers by keeping charges minimal. It is also important to educate all stakeholders about working in unison to fulfill the Government’s mission of promoting a less-cash society.


Q38. WELL
Directions: Choose the word/group of words which is MOST OPPOSITE in meaning of the word/group of words printed in bold (highlighted in colour) as used in the passage.

With telecom and internet penetration growing steadily, digital payments are winning acceptance in India. A Google- BCG report released last year estimated the Indian digital payments industry would grow to $500 billion by 2020 and would account for 15 per cent of India’s GDP. It also said more than 50 per cent of the internet users in the country would embrace digital payments by 2020. The Government’s recent demonetisation drive has transformed the entire digital payments scenario almost overnight. The biggest beneficiaries of the move, of course, have been mobile wallet companies. User numbers for mobile wallets have soared. For digital wallet companies, this has been driven primarily by the low number of point-of-sales (PoS) machines (required to swipe credit or debit cards) across the country. While the country has over 14 million retail outlets, PoS machines number barely 1.5 million. Low penetration of PoS terminals across India is a problem. Digital India being one of the 10 major thrust areas in Budget 2017-18, plans are underway to ramp up these numbers.


Indian banks will be introducing one million PoS terminals bythis month. Another two million Aadhaar-linked PoS terminals maybe commissioned by September. That said, for a nation of a billion -plus people, a few million PoS terminals are merely drops in the ocean.


Next, the masses are still unable to use smartphones efficiently to make mobile payments easily. For this to happen, smartphone sales and penetration across India need to rise dramatically. But that’s easier said than done due to multiple barriers, particularly since India is an extremely price-sensitive market.


The third challenge that assails both urban and rural, rich and poor users concerns security. The fear of a security breach leading to their money being siphoned off is especially true for new users of e-payment. While various such options exist, each of which has intrinsic security features, users lack reassurance that these are fully secure. Occasional reports of security breaches only heighten such apprehensions. In this case, the best way forward is for digital payment entities to significantly enhance security features, whereby hacking such systems becomes well-nigh impossible. This may be possible via multiple layers of protection such as stringent encryption, use of biometrics and multiple software levels that drive near- total secure transactions. While focusing on security, a digital payment system should also be simple, safe and convenient to use, and remain platform-agnostic. In essence, the system should work seamlessly irrespective of whether customers are using credit or debit cards or making payments through already-active payment platforms such as digital wallets or the Government’s UPI (Unified Payment Interface). Apart from the above, lack of acceptability of digital wallets among vendors is another hurdle as many are still behind the technology adoption curve. It’s imperative to minimise entry barriers for customers by keeping charges minimal. It is also important to educate all stakeholders about working in unison to fulfill the Government’s mission of promoting a less-cash society.


Q39. UNISON
Directions: Choose the word/group of words which is MOST OPPOSITE in meaning of the word/group of words printed in bold (highlighted in colour) as used in the passage.

With telecom and internet penetration growing steadily, digital payments are winning acceptance in India. A Google- BCG report released last year estimated the Indian digital payments industry would grow to $500 billion by 2020 and would account for 15 per cent of India’s GDP. It also said more than 50 per cent of the internet users in the country would embrace digital payments by 2020. The Government’s recent demonetisation drive has transformed the entire digital payments scenario almost overnight. The biggest beneficiaries of the move, of course, have been mobile wallet companies. User numbers for mobile wallets have soared. For digital wallet companies, this has been driven primarily by the low number of point-of-sales (PoS) machines (required to swipe credit or debit cards) across the country. While the country has over 14 million retail outlets, PoS machines number barely 1.5 million. Low penetration of PoS terminals across India is a problem. Digital India being one of the 10 major thrust areas in Budget 2017-18, plans are underway to ramp up these numbers.


Indian banks will be introducing one million PoS terminals bythis month. Another two million Aadhaar-linked PoS terminals maybe commissioned by September. That said, for a nation of a billion -plus people, a few million PoS terminals are merely drops in the ocean.


Next, the masses are still unable to use smartphones efficiently to make mobile payments easily. For this to happen, smartphone sales and penetration across India need to rise dramatically. But that’s easier said than done due to multiple barriers, particularly since India is an extremely price-sensitive market.


The third challenge that assails both urban and rural, rich and poor users concerns security. The fear of a security breach leading to their money being siphoned off is especially true for new users of e-payment. While various such options exist, each of which has intrinsic security features, users lack reassurance that these are fully secure. Occasional reports of security breaches only heighten such apprehensions. In this case, the best way forward is for digital payment entities to significantly enhance security features, whereby hacking such systems becomes well-nigh impossible. This may be possible via multiple layers of protection such as stringent encryption, use of biometrics and multiple software levels that drive near- total secure transactions. While focusing on security, a digital payment system should also be simple, safe and convenient to use, and remain platform-agnostic. In essence, the system should work seamlessly irrespective of whether customers are using credit or debit cards or making payments through already-active payment platforms such as digital wallets or the Government’s UPI (Unified Payment Interface). Apart from the above, lack of acceptability of digital wallets among vendors is another hurdle as many are still behind the technology adoption curve. It’s imperative to minimise entry barriers for customers by keeping charges minimal. It is also important to educate all stakeholders about working in unison to fulfill the Government’s mission of promoting a less-cash society.


Q40. ASSAILS
Directions (41-45): Study the following graph carefully and answer the questions that follow:


Q41. How many students travel by bus from school C?
Q42. What is the difference between number of girls who travel by bus from school A and those from school B?
Q43. What is the ratio of number of boys per bus travelling from school C to that of school B?
Q44. What is the average number of girls per bus travelling from all the schools together?
Q45. How many boys travel by bus from school B and D together?
Directions: Study the information given below and answer the questions that follow:

Ratio of imports to exports of two companies over the years:
Q46.
In how many of the given years were the imports more than the exports in case of company A?
Directions: Study the information given below and answer the questions that follow:

Ratio of imports to exports of two companies over the years:
Q47.
If the imports of Company B in year 2011 were 51.688 lakh, then what were the exports of Company B in the same year?
Directions: Study the information given below and answer the questions that follow:

Ratio of imports to exports of two companies over the years:

Q48.
If the exports of Company A and Company B were equal to 84 lakh in year 2012 then what will be the difference between imports of Company B and imports of Company A in that year?
Directions: Study the information given below and answer the questions that follow:

Ratio of imports to exports of two companies over the years:
Q49.
If the exports of Company A in year 2009 and exports of Company B in year 2012 were equal then the imports of company B in 2012 is approximately what percentage of imports of Company A in 2009?
Directions: Study the information given below and answer the questions that follow:

Ratio of imports to exports of two companies over the years:
Q50.
In year 2009, if the export of Company B is increased by 100% and import is increased by 200%. Then what will be the new ratio of import to export of Company B in that year?

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